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"Brain Death"
Question from Anonymous on 11/12/2013:

The National Catholic Bioethics Center says that a faithful Catholic may receive organs from a donor who is declared dead by neurological criteria. What do you think?

http://www.ncbcenter.org/page.aspx?pid=1285

Answer by Judie Brown on 11/15/2013:

Dear Anonymous

I agree with the physicians and ethicists who stand by the teaching of the Church that the patient whose organs are to be taken must be truly dead. As the Catechism states:

2296 Organ transplants are in conformity with the moral law if the physical and psychological dangers and risks to the donor are proportionate to the good sought for the recipient. Organ donation after death is a noble and meritorious act and is to be encouraged as a expression of generous solidarity. It is not morally acceptable if the donor or his proxy has not given explicit consent. Moreover, it is not morally admissible to bring about the disabling mutilation or death of a human being, even in order to delay the death of other persons.

The diagnosis described as brain death is not necessarily accurate; therefore we stand by Catholic doctrine.

Judie Brown

COPYRIGHT 2014

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